HOME BROCHURE TESTIMONIALS CONTACT US
SAT
(NEW SAT)
GRE GMAT Individual Tutoring
 
 
Name*
:
Email *
:
Mobile no*
:
City*
:
Query*
:
Interested in*
:
SAT I (NEW SAT)  
SAT II (SAT SUB. TEST)
PSAT (8/9 & 10) 
ACT       AP       ELEP      TOEFL  IELTS     ISEE   SSAT      GRE   GMAT
Individual Tutoring
 
Security Code*
:
 
FAQs
 
Bridges International
 
How do I register?
You can call our centre and register for classes.  At registration you can schedule a free diagnostic exam and an introductory parent/student counselling session with the Director.
How do I know if I need test prep?
Take a practice test to see how you'll score! Contact Bridges International  any time to schedule a free practice test. Then, you'll have an idea of where to start and which Bridges International classes might be right for you.
What is the size of the Prep Group?
Our class size never exceeds over 4 to 6 studends.

Personal attention is also very important and given to every student. This is ensured by getting students involved in their learning and giving them regular feedback on their progress. This can only occur if a student is taught in a small group pr on a one to one basis. This is a primary philosophy of education which translates into our class size being small and which never exceeds over 4 to 6 studends.

NEW SAT

Who are Bridges International's teachers?
Bridges International's expert educators care about the success of their students. All instructors have a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree or a Master’s. At Bridges International, we only hire teachers who are experts in their fields and who have the necessary energy and enthusiasm to effectively engage their students.
When should I start preparing for the NEW SAT ?
It's best to start early in building fundamental academic skills. At Bridges International we encourage students to read a large number of books as we think it is the best way to get a head start on learning vocabulary and critical reading. Memorizing vocabulary lists is not the most effective way to build vocabulary. Most students start studying for the NEW SAT in the 11th grade/standard.
What is SAT/NEW SAT ?
When people talk about the SAT,* they usually mean the SAT Reasoning Test* (formerly known as the NEW SAT), the most widely taken college entrance exam for admission to colleges and universities in the United States. The SAT is geared toward testing a student's logic and reasoning ability, and over 2 million students take it each year. Colleges and universities consider your SAT scores, along with other factors like high school GPA, extracurricular activities, personal statements, and interviews, when making admissions decisions.

The test takes 3 hours and 45 minutes to complete, and has three sections that test reading, writing, and mathematics. Most questions are multiple-choice. A separate score is reported on a scale of 200-800 for each of these three components.

The SAT is administered by the College Board. It is offered six times a year in India, Except for the test in January, all the tests are held during the first Saturday in May, June, October, November, and December. Many students take the test in the the 11th grade or in the first semester of their 12th grade. SAT results are accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the United States. The letters "SAT" have no official meaning. They originally stood for "Scholastic Aptitude Test," when the test was founded in 1926, but the acronym was abandoned.
What's a good NEW SAT score?

The short answer: for the New SAT (out of 1600), 1000 is considered an average score. Half the U.S. students score better than this, and the other half score below this, roughly. 
For the Old SAT (out of 2400), 1500 is the national average score.
The top 25% of SAT takers score about 1200 or more (or 1800 on the Old SAT); if your New SAT score is above 1200, then that's quite good. Whether this is good enough to get into the colleges you care about is what we'll cover next.
The bottom 25% of SAT takers score 840 (or 1260 on the Old SAT)if you're scoring in that range, be careful! It may be hard for you to get into the college you want to attend.
Again, to reiterate:

 

New SAT (of 1600)

Old SAT (of 2400)

Excellent (top 25%)

1200

1800

Good (Average)

1000

1500

Poor (lowest 25%)

840

1260

Here is the precise chart of percentiles, provided by the College Board.
The round number 1000 is not a coincidence.  The SAT makers actually design the test so the target average score is 1000, and the target score per section is 500.
Remember, the lowest you can score on the SAT is 400, and the highest you can score is 1600.
One popular definition of a good SAT score must depend on what college you're aiming for.  What you really care about is how good your SAT score is compared to the average score of international students at schools that you're planning to apply to. If you don't get a score above your target score, you may find it hard to get into the colleges you're looking for.

Want to improve your SAT score by 200 - 250 points?  Contact Us

Is the NEW SAT an Aptitude or an I.Q. test?
The NEW SAT tests proficiency in Reading, Writing and Mathematics. The reading sections measure reading comprehension skills and knowledge of English vocabulary. The writing sections measure your ability to write a essay and to correct someone else's writing to the standards of formal written English. The mathematics sections measure proficiency in applying basic mathematical concepts up to algebra and geometry. All of these are learned skills, not some inherent intelligence.
I have high grades in school, so will I get a high score on the NEW SAT ?
Because the NEW SAT doesn't directly test the subjects you study in school, some students tend to underperform on the NEW SAT because they are unfamiliar with the format and particular question types that appear on the test. The combination of an excellent GPA and average or poor NEW SAT scores can be a red flag for admissions officers.
I've heard that there is no negative marking on the NEW SAT?
Since there is no negative marking do not leave any question unanswered. It's often to your advantage to make an educated guess if you can eliminate any answer choices because you are confident that they are wrong. Each eliminated answer choice increases chances you will get the right answer.
If I take the NEW SAT more than once, are the scores averaged or can I combine my highest scores on each section when reporting them to colleges?
No, the scores are not averaged.

Score Choice gives you the option to choose which scores (by test date for the NEW SAT and by individual test for NEW SAT Subject Tests) you send to colleges — in accordance with an institution's stated score-use practice.If you decide not to use Score Choice, all of your scores will be sent to your recipients.

Whether a school allows combined scores or not, this combination only applies to the self-reported scores you enter in your application. The official test report that the College Board sends directly to colleges will include all scores from every time you took the test.
Will NEW SAT Super scoring help me?
Not all colleges will super score the NEW SAT. We recommend you set a goal for yourself by doing research on the colleges and universities you're interested in attending.
How many times can I take the NEW SAT ?
There is no limit to the number of times you can take the SAT. If you have already taken the NEW SAT want to improve your score it may make sense to retake it if you have been studying hard and improving your basic skills. If you are simply hoping to get lucky and raise your score a little, you're probably wasting your time and money.

SAT Subject Tests/SAT II

What's the difference between the NEW SAT Reasoning Test and the SAT Subject Tests?
The NEW SAT Reasoning Test is designed to test your general math, verbal and writing abilities. The NEW SAT Subject Tests test your knowledge of specific academic subjects such as math, chemistry, biology, history, and foreign languages. The NEW SAT Subject math tests cover more advanced topics than appear on the SAT Reasoning Test. The NEW SAT and subject tests are usually offered on the same day, but you cannot take both at the same time. The NEW SAT is a four-hour test. The subject tests are each one hour long, and you may take as many as three on any one test date.

Not all subject tests are offered every test date. Check the schedule carefully when planning the tests you will take.
What's the difference between the NEW SAT Reasoning Test and the SAT Subject Tests? / SAT II
The SAT Reasoning Test is designed to test your general math, verbal and writing abilities. The SAT Subject Tests test your knowledge of specific academic subjects such as MATH, CHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY, HISTORY, and foreign languages.

The SAT Subject MATH tests cover more advanced topics than that on the SAT Reasoning Test. The SAT and subject Tests are usually offered on the same day, but you cannot take both at the same time.

The SAT is a four-hour test. The subject tests are each one hour long, and you may take as many as three on any one test date.

Not all subject tests are offered every test date. Check the schedule carefully when planning the tests you will take.
Should I take the SAT Subject Tests / SAT II ? If so, which ones?
That depends on where you're planning to apply. At the most selective schools, SAT Subject Tests can be just as important as the NEW SAT or ACT. Each college has its own guidelines regarding Subject Tests. For example, Harvard, MIT, and Princeton all require at least two Subject Tests. Other schools recommend or strongly recommend certain SAT Subject Tests. Many schools don't require or state that they recommend them, but will consider Subject Test results when making their admissions decisions.

Our advice: take two or three SAT Subject Tests in the areas that will demonstrate your talents the most. If you think you'll score best in Biology and Math then take those subject tests. If you're planning to major in English, the Literature Subject Tests might be a good choice. Take the SAT Subject Tests that you will score the best on, and the ones that fulfil the requirements of the schools to which you're going to apply.

ACT

What is ACT?
The ACT* is a very widely taken college entrance exam for admission to colleges in the United States. It is a curriculum-based test of of the knowledge that you have accumulated in high school. Colleges and universities consider your ACT scores, along with other factors like high school GPA, extracurricular activities, personal statements, and interviews, when making admissions decisions.

The ACT consists of four subject area tests in English, Math, Reading, and Science, plus an optional Writing test. All 215 questions are multiple-choice, with the exception of the Writing test, which consists of a 30-minute essay response to a single prompt. The ACT takes approximately 3 hours and 30 minutes to complete, and an additional 30 minutes if you also take the Writing test. (Many colleges require the ACT Plus Writing test for students who plan to submit their ACT score to satisfy the examination requirement for college admission.) A separate score is reported on a scale of 1-36 for each of the four subject area tests. (Your Writing test subscore will be included in your English score.) Your composite ACT score will be a number from 1-36, an average of your scores on all four tests.

The ACT is administered by ACT, Inc. It is offered each year in February, April, June, September, October, and December. Many students take the test in the 11th grade and some in the 12th grade. ACT results are accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the United States.

The letters "ACT" originally stood for "American College Testing," when the test was founded in 1956, but name was shortened to simply "ACT" in 1996.
What's a good ACT score?

The short answer: 20 (composite score) is the national ACT average in the U.S.A.  About half of students score above that, and half of students score below.  The top 25% of ACT takers score about 24 or more, so if your score is above 24, that's excellent.  The bottom 25% of ACT takers score 16 or less -- so if you're scoring in that range, be careful!  
Again, to reiterate:
> 24 = Excellent
20 = Good (Average)
< 16 = Lowest Quarter
Here is the precise Official ACT chart of percentiles
The number 20 is not a coincidence.  The ACT makers actually design the test so the target average score is about a 20, and the target section score is 20 on each ACT section as well.
Remember that the lowest score you can get on the ACT total is 1, and the highest you can get is 36.  If you're comparing your ACT score against the SAT, keep in mind that the SAT has a much higher minimum score.
Now, these are statistics on a U.S. national level. What's really important to you is how your ACT score compares to other international students applying to the same colleges as you are. If you don't impress the admissions officers with your stats, you may find it hard to get in.
One popular definition of a good ACT score depends on what college you're aiming for.  What you really care about is how good your ACT score is compared to the average score of students at schools that you're planning to apply to. If you don't get a score above your target score, you may find it hard to get into the colleges you're looking for.

Want to improve your ACT score by 3 - 5 points? Contact Us

 

Should I Take the SAT or the ACT?

The SAT and the ACT are both standardized college entrance exams intended to test students’ readiness for college, and both of them are accepted by virtually all four-year colleges and universities in the United States. They also happen to be significantly different in many ways.

Which test is better? Let’s take a look at a few of the major differences:


Courtsey: Alex Heimbach

General Test Structure 
As you'll see in the chart below, the redesigned SAT is radically streamlined—there are now only four sections and the scoring has returned to the original 400-1600 (instead of the current 600-2400). The wrong answer penalty will also be eliminated. 
The ACT format, meanwhile, is essentially the same. The essay is slightly longer, however.

 

New SAT

ACT

Total Time

3 hrs (plus 50 min for essay)

2 hrs 55 min (plus 40 min for essay)

Number of sections

4 plus essay

4 plus essay

Sections

Reading:  65 min
Writing and Language: 35 min
Math (No calculator): 25 min
Math (with calculator): 55 min
Optional essay: 50 min

English: 45 min
Math:  60 min
Reading: 35 min
Science: 35 min
Optional essay: 40 min

Scoring

Two section scores, Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (includes Reading and Writing and Language) and Math, on  a 200-800 scale combined for a total score from 400-1600

Four section scores scaled from 1-36 averaged for a composite from 1-36

Wrong answer penalty?

No

No

 

Reading
Since the new SAT will include only long passages and the ACT recently added paired passages, the two tests' reading sections have become much more similar.
Nonetheless, there are still some major differences in the types of questions they ask: the evidence questions on the redesigned SAT are especially different from ACT reading questions.

 

New SAT

ACT

Time

65  min

35 min

Format

4 single passages and 1 pair, 10-11 questions each

4 passages, potentially including 1 paired passage, 10 questions each

# of questions

5 passages, 52 questions

4 passages, 40 questions

Time per passage/question

13 min/75 sec

8 min, 45 sec/53 sec

Passage types

1 U.S. or World Literature, 2 History or Social Studies, 2 Science

1 Prose Fiction or Literary Narrative, 1 Social Sciences, 1 Humanities, 1 Natural Sciences

Question types

Main Idea, Vocab-in-Context, Inference, Evidence Support, Data Reasoning, Technique, Detail-Oriented

Main Idea, Vocab-in-Context, Inference, Detail-Oriented

Key skills

Reading comprehension, inferring ideas, identifying evidence

Reading comprehension, inferring ideas, locating details

 

 SAT Writing and Language/ACT English
SAT Writing and Language (formerly SAT writing) is the other SAT section that the redesign will make markedly more similar to its ACT equivalent. The College Board is ditching Identifying Sentence Errors and the rest of its question styles for an ACT-style passage structure.
However, the new SAT writing section still doesn't include the big-picture organization and main idea questions that the ACT English section does.

 

New SAT

ACT

Time

35  min

45 min

Format

4 passages, 11 questions each

5 passages, 15 questions each

Total # of questions

44 questions

75 questions

Time per passage/question

8 min, 45 sec/48 sec

9 min/36 sec

Content

Standard English Conventions: 20 questions (45%), covering sentence structure, conventions of usage, and conventions of punctuation
Expression of Ideas: 24 questions (55%), covering development, organization and effective language use

Usage and Mechanics: sentence structure (20-25%), grammar and usage (15-20%), and punctuation (10-15%)
Rhetorical Skills: style (15-20%), strategy (15-20%), and organization (10-15%)

Key Skills

Understanding grammar rules,  expressing ideas clearly, connecting sentences logically

Understanding grammar rules,  connecting sentences logically, recognizing overall structure and argument

 

Math
The redesigned SAT math section will focus on a more limited set of topics, primarily algebra. The diminished presence of geometry sets the new SAT math section apart from the one on the ACT, which is still roughly a third geometry and trigonometry questions.
Redesigned SAT math will also include a no-calculator section, a significant number of data analysis problems, and simpler wording for questions.

 

New SAT

ACT

Time

80 min

60 min

Format

Divided in to two sections
No calculator: 20 questions (4 grid-ins), 25 min
With calculator: 38 questions (9 grid-ins), 55 min

1 section, all questions multiple choice

Total # of questions

58 questions

60 questions

Time per question

No calculator: 75 sec
With calculator: 87 sec

1 min

Content

Heart of Algebra — 33%
Problem Solving and Data Analysis — 28%
Passport to Advanced Math — 29%
Additional Topics in Math — 10%

Pre-algebra — 20-25%
Elementary algebra — 15-20%
Intermediate algebra — 15-20%
Coordinate geometry — 15-20%
Plane geometry — 20-25%
Trigonometry — 5-10%

Key Skills

Doing simple calculations without a calculator, translating word problems, analyzing data

Memorizing formulas, translating word problems, working quickly without making errors

Science
The redesigned SAT still doesn't have a separate science section, but it does include science questions in all three of the other sections.
Those questions are primarily focused on reading charts and graphs, while ACT science tests a wider range of skills.

 

New SAT

ACT

Time

N/A

35 min

Format

No specific section, 2 passages in reading (21 questions), 1 passage in Writing (6 questions), and 8 questions in Math

~7 passages, with 5-7 questions each

Total # of questions

35 questions

40 questions

Time per passage/question

Varies by section

5 min/53 sec

Content

Varies by section

Data Representation — 30-40%
Research Summaries — 45-55%
Conflicting Viewpoints — 15-20%

Key Skills

Understanding scientific ideas, reading charts and graphs

Doing simple calculations without a calculator, reading charts and graphs, analyzing experimental design

SAT Essay/ACT Writing
The ACT writing section (the essay) is the one part of the test that's undergoing major changes. You'll still be presented with an issue and asked for your opinion on it, but you'll also be given three perspectives on the topics and asked to analyze them. 
The new SAT essay, on the other hand, will be more similar to the type of papers you write in English class: the prompt asks you to read and analyze a persuasive essay.

 

New SAT

ACT

Time

50 min

40 min

Optional?

Yes

Yes

Format

Presented with an essay or article and asked to analyze the author's argument

Presented with 3 viewpoints on a topic and asked to analyze those ideas as well as argue for your own perspective

Grading Critera

Writing, Reading, and Analysis

Ideas and Analysis, Development and Support, Organization, and Language Use and Conventions

Scoring

Given a score from 2-8 for each dimension

Scaled score from 1-36

 


PSAT

What is PSAT?
PSAT/NMSQT* is short for "Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test." It has approximately the same format as the SAT Reasoning Test, except it is shorter, somewhat easier, and does not include an essay.

You will usually take the PSAT at your own high school, and you will need to sign up to take the PSAT through your high school, not through the College Board. If you are home-schooled, you will need to contact the principal of a local school and arrange to take the test there.

Each component of the test is scored on a scale of 20 to 80, which is essentially equivalent to the SAT Reasoning Test's scale of 200 to 800 divided by 10.

Taking the PSAT/NMSQT helps you become familiar with the format of the SAT Reasoning Test and can give you an idea of how well prepared you are for it.



For more details look at the PSAT 8/9 & PSAT 10 in our Program section
What's the difference between the SAT Reasoning Test and the PSAT?
PSAT stands for Preliminary SAT. It is designed to familiarize you with the kinds of questions you will see on the SAT, to suggest how you may do on the real SAT. Most sections of the PSAT contain the same types of questions you will see on the SAT, although test is shorter and the questions a little easier. Your PSAT scores are reported to your school. They are not sent to any colleges to which you apply.
 
Home
About Us
Our Difference
Programs
FAQs
Testimonials
Brochure
Contact us

 

 
 
         
       
           
       
           
           
     
Page links
Home
About Us
Programs
Our Difference
Testimonials
FAQs
Contact Us
 
Contact Us
ADDRESS : 2/6 Keki Court,
Cumballa Hill Lane,
Opp Shalimar Hotel, Mumbai:400036
Email : info@bridgesinternational.in
Mobile : +91-8767802500
Telephone : +91-(222)-3863993
Website : bridgesinternational.in


Our Programs
•  SAT (NEW SAT)
•  SAT II (SAT SUB. TEST)
•  PSAT 8/9 & 10
•  ACT
•  AP
•  ELEP
•  TOEFL
•  IELTS
•  ISEE
•  SSAT
GRE
GMAT
Individual Tutoring
 
 
© Bridges International 2015 - All Right Reserved Powered By CREATIVEBUGS